No Sub Plans! MS Sunday Funday

#msSunFun I’m not going to lie.  I DON’T HAVE SUB PLANS!  This is not good because I’m going to miss 3 days in October / November for school trips and the NCAIS conference (I’m presenting, yeah!).

I do have a substitute binder with overall instructions, my class lists, and two manilla folders with my seating charts in them.  But right now, that is about it!

I usually have my students work on their math wiki pages or chose topics that they need help on from the Concept Help Pages.  There, they can watch videos, do extra example problems, and even play math games!  However, even though it is FIXED now, our internet has been iffy this year, so I would love to have a paper and pencil back up plan.  My students LOVE those coordinate graph sheets that make a picture when you are done, but I can’t find any good ones.  I am thinking of assigning them the task of creating their own coordinate graph picture (for their friend to solve).  Has anyone done this?

My director suggested that I let my students play my math center games when I am absent.  That is a fabulous idea and it IS my goal, but I don’t have enough games – and it is not yet organized in a way that students can just go and pick out a game.  Also, I need an in-class “trial run” once everything is all organized and labeled so that I can help students pick out games (and put them back), the first time.  I don’t want them picking games that are too difficult for them and causing stress for the sub.  I can’t wait to have this in place for my students, but it is not going to happen by October 18th!

I am excited to read about other middle school teachers sub plans – so please post today and help me out.  🙂

10 thoughts on “No Sub Plans! MS Sunday Funday

  1. Pingback: Sub Plans – MS Sunday Funday | I Speak Math

  2. I have to admit that I was never good about keeping sub plans, either. Then, on the few days I woke up ill or unable to go to school, I found myself scrambling to find things for my sub to do with my kids. Here’s an idea that I have used in the past: tell the students they are going to have a unit test. The catch? They make up the test. Then, they can work in small groups to make a “test” that completely covers the topics they are learning about in that current unit. Give them a rubric that specifies what types of questions are required (10 questions total, 3 multiple choice, 2 open-ended, 3 word problems, etc.) and have them include an answer key! It is a good way to formatively assess their understanding while you are out.

  3. In a past year I have had students draw a simple picture with all straight lines … find the slope of every line … write the equation for every line. Glad you mentioned it because I could add this idea to my list of possible sub plans after our next unit.

  4. Yes! I did make your own coordinate graphing picture for many years and called it Graphiti like some of the old books I have. It is great! Some kids are so artistic. Some kids go way overboard and then they spend forever writing coordinates. I would usually have them make the picture, then put it in a plastic sleeve so they can trace with a dry erase marker as they write down the coordinates.

  5. Yes! I did make your own coordinate graphing picture for many years and called it Graphiti like some of the old books I have. It is great! Some kids are so artistic. Some kids go way overboard and then they spend forever writing coordinates. I would usually have them make the picture, then put it in a plastic sleeve so they can trace with a dry erase marker as they write down the coordinates.

    Since I teach algebra I still have them make a picture but they have to do slope, equation of the line, identify y int, x int, domain and range, parallel and perpendicular lines, so I still get some lovely pictures to put up on my walls.

  6. I’ve had my students make coordinate graphing pictures of their initials or favorite team name. Maybe you could give them some options and let them choose?

    I really love the idea of using plastic sleeves for this, but if you do that make sure you have fine-tip dry-erase markers because the regular ones write too big to plot points on the grid.

  7. LearnBop is a great for sub plans. Basically, the teacher can choose a playlist for the class for the day of step by step tutorials the students can work on. The tutorials are like having a tutor sitting with each student guiding them through the process.

  8. I did a project like that for years. I started them by having to follow my directions and generate a picture I designed. Then, the next day, they would create their own picture. We called it the Connect the Dots project. Once they created their own picture and instructions, they would hand in their picture to me and trade instructions with a partner. The partner followed the instructions to see if they could generate the original picture. I’m trying to see if I can find my instructions sheet so that I can share it with you.

  9. MathBits has great coordinate plain pics. I have my kids do it on flip chart graph paper as partners. takes them prob. two days

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